fbpx
LEARN HOW TO PLAY GUITAR FROM ANYWHERE!

LEARN HOW TO PLAY GUITAR TODAY & SAVE!

LEARN HOW TO PLAY GUITAR TODAY & SAVE!

PARENTS CORNER

How studying music is important for childREN and adults alike.
Children and Musical Education

Children who study music tend to have larger vocabularies and more advanced reading skills than their peers. Regardless of socioeconomic status or school district, students who participate in high-quality music programs score higher on English, reading and spelling tests. Students in top-quality instrumental programs score higher in mathematics than children who do not participate. Substantial majorities of both teachers and parents view student access to music and arts education as “extremely” or “very” important. Both parents and teachers have high standards and expectations from quality music programs.

Teachers also believe more strongly that music education can build 21 st century skills, such as communication, critical thinking, problem solving and innovation skills. It’s striking that both teachers and parents strongly believe music education has a positive impact on overall academic performance. Federal education policy specifically authorizes the use of Title I funds for music and arts education.

Arts and music are among the six basic academic subject areas students should study in order to  succeed in college. Nine in ten adults believe students benefit from having music included in their
curriculum.

Research has shown that grade-school children who took music lessons scored higher on tests of general and spatial cognitive development, the abilities that form the basis for performance in math
and engineering. A study of 8 to 11- year-olds found that, those who had extra-curricular music classes, developed higher verbal IQ, and visual abilities, in comparison to those with no musical training.

Everyday listening skills are stronger in musically-trained children than in those without music training. Music training in childhood “fundamentally alters the nervous system such that neural changes persist in adulthood after auditory training has ceased”.

Children with learning disabilities or dyslexia who tend to lose focus with more noise could benefit greatly from music lessons. Young children who take music lessons show different brain development and improved memory compared with children who do not receive musical training. Musically trained children performed better in a memory test that is correlated with general intelligence skills such as literacy, verbal memory, visio-spatial processing, mathematics and IQ.

Music and math are highly intertwined. By understanding beat, rhythm and scales, children are learning how to divide, create fractions and recognize patterns. A study at the University of California demonstrated that young children who participated in music instruction showed dramatic enhancements in abstract reasoning skills. Playing a musical instrument strengthens eye-hand coordination and fine motor skills, and children who study an instrument learn a lot about discipline,
dedication and the rewards of hard work.

Music training not only helps children develop fine motor skills, but aids emotional and behavioral maturation as well. Children who study a musical instrument are more likely to excel in all of their studies, work better in teams, have enhanced critical thinking skills, stay in school, and pursue further education. Majorities of parents whose children are involved in music classes also credit music education for making them happier, more focused, more self-disciplined, stronger academically and more helpful. Taking music lessons offers a space where children learn how to accept and give constructive criticism. Children who make music have been shown to get along better with classmates and have fewer discipline problems.

One of the biggest kicks is to see a child come into a music program as an introvert and leave as a student leader. Music and the arts can help students become tenacious, team-oriented problem solvers who are confident and able to think creatively. Being able to think on their feet, approach tasks from different perspective and think “outside of the box” will distinguish your child from others. Research indicates the brain of a musician, even a young one, works differently than that of a non-musician. There’s some good neuroscience research that children involved in music have larger growth of neural activity than people not in music training.

Research tells us children who play music do better in school and in life. Students in the arts are found to be more cooperative with teachers and peers, more self-confident and better able to express their ideas. Students who participated in music lessons showed statistically higher IQs. The skills gained through sequential music instruction, including discipline and the ability to analyze, solve problems, communicate and work cooperatively, are vital for success in the 21 st century workplace.

OUR COURSES

PARENTS CORNER

How studying music is important for children and adults alike.

Children and Musical Education

Children who study music tend to have larger vocabularies and more advanced reading skills than their peers. Regardless of socioeconomic status or school district, students who participate in high-quality music programs score higher on English, reading and spelling tests. Students in top-quality instrumental programs score higher in mathematics than children who do not participate. Substantial majorities of both teachers and parents view student access to music and arts education as “extremely” or “very” important. Both parents and teachers have high standards and expectations from quality music programs.

Teachers also believe more strongly that music education can build 21 st century skills, such as communication, critical thinking, problem solving and innovation skills. It’s striking that both teachers and parents strongly believe music education has a positive impact on overall academic performance. Federal education policy specifically authorizes the use of Title I funds for music and arts education.

Arts and music are among the six basic academic subject areas students should study in order to  succeed in college. Nine in ten adults believe students benefit from having music included in their
curriculum.

Research has shown that grade-school children who took music lessons scored higher on tests of general and spatial cognitive development, the abilities that form the basis for performance in math
and engineering. A study of 8 to 11- year-olds found that, those who had extra-curricular music classes, developed higher verbal IQ, and visual abilities, in comparison to those with no musical training.

Everyday listening skills are stronger in musically-trained children than in those without music training. Music training in childhood “fundamentally alters the nervous system such that neural changes persist in adulthood after auditory training has ceased”.

Children with learning disabilities or dyslexia who tend to lose focus with more noise could benefit greatly from music lessons. Young children who take music lessons show different brain development and improved memory compared with children who do not receive musical training. Musically trained children performed better in a memory test that is correlated with general intelligence skills such as literacy, verbal memory, visio-spatial processing, mathematics and IQ.

Music and math are highly intertwined. By understanding beat, rhythm and scales, children are learning how to divide, create fractions and recognize patterns. A study at the University of California demonstrated that young children who participated in music instruction showed dramatic enhancements in abstract reasoning skills. Playing a musical instrument strengthens eye-hand coordination and fine motor skills, and children who study an instrument learn a lot about discipline,
dedication and the rewards of hard work.

Music training not only helps children develop fine motor skills, but aids emotional and behavioral maturation as well. Children who study a musical instrument are more likely to excel in all of their studies, work better in teams, have enhanced critical thinking skills, stay in school, and pursue further education. Majorities of parents whose children are involved in music classes also credit music education for making them happier, more focused, more self-disciplined, stronger academically and more helpful. Taking music lessons offers a space where children learn how to accept and give constructive criticism. Children who make music have been shown to get along better with classmates and have fewer discipline problems.

One of the biggest kicks is to see a child come into a music program as an introvert and leave as a student leader. Music and the arts can help students become tenacious, team-oriented problem solvers who are confident and able to think creatively. Being able to think on their feet, approach tasks from different perspective and think “outside of the box” will distinguish your child from others. Research indicates the brain of a musician, even a young one, works differently than that of a non-musician. There’s some good neuroscience research that children involved in music have larger growth of neural activity than people not in music training.

Research tells us children who play music do better in school and in life. Students in the arts are found to be more cooperative with teachers and peers, more self-confident and better able to express their ideas. Students who participated in music lessons showed statistically higher IQs. The skills gained through sequential music instruction, including discipline and the ability to analyze, solve problems, communicate and work cooperatively, are vital for success in the 21 st century workplace.

OUR COURSES

Electric Guitar

Electric Guitar is the most commonly used of all guitars. Great for Pop, Rock, Blues and Jazz.

Metal Acoustic Guitar

Metal Acoustic Guitar is great for Folk, Pop, rock and no power or amplifier required.

Fingerpicking Guitar

Fingerpicking Guitar also called Nylon String, Classical or Flamenco Guitar is commonly used in Pop, Flamenco and Classical music also no power required.

Electric Guitar

Electric Guitar is the most commonly used of all guitars. Great for Pop, Rock, Blues and Jazz.

Metal Acoustic Guitar

Metal Acoustic Guitar is great for Folk, Pop, rock and no power or amplifier required.

Fingerpicking Guitar

Fingerpicking Guitar also called Nylon String, Classical or Flamenco Guitar is commonly used in Pop, Flamenco and Classical music also no power required.

RECOMMENDED GUITAR EQUIPMENT FOR EACH COURSE

I recommend that most students start with an Electric Guitar which you can buy with an amplifier – see the links below.

RECOMMENDED ELECTRIC GUITAR

Electric Guitar for students ages 4 to 8 year olds:

Electric Guitar for students ages 8 to 100 years old:

RECOMMENDED METAL ACOUSTIC GUITAR

METAL STRING ACOUSTIC GUITAR for students ages 4 to 8 year olds:

Electric Guitar for students ages 8 to 100 years old:

RECOMMENDED FINGERPICKING GUITAR

Fingerpicking Guitar also called Nylon String, Classical or Flamenco Guitar for students ages 4 to 8 year olds:

Fingerpicking Guitar also called Nylon String, Classical or Flamenco Guitar Guitar for students ages 8 to 100 years old:

LEARN HOW TO PLAY GUITAR TODAY & SAVE!

As you can see these guitars range in price from $55 to $120 dollars.

For beginners I would not recommend spending more.

My goal is to get you playing properly in the most economic way possible!

It’s better to have a average guitar and get lessons then to spend thousands of dollars on a guitar and not really know what your doing.
Most guitarists make this critical mistake!
Eddie Van Halen’s first guitar cost $300.00 dollars. Yet, he played incredibly great because he knew what he was doing!

Now lets look at the good effects of learning guitar for our children’s mental well-being and to increase their intelligence.

I have personally witnessed incredible improvements in concentration and ADD behaviors.

 

This article originally appeared on the Bachelors Degree website.

Nearly everyone enjoys music, whether by listening to it, singing, or playing an instrument. But despite this almost universal interest, many schools are having to do away with their music education programs. This is a mistake, with schools losing not only an enjoyable subject, but a subject that can enrich students’ lives and education. Read on to learn why music education is so important, and how it offers benefits even beyond itself.

1. Musical training helps develop language and reasoning: Students who have early musical training will develop the areas of the brain related to language and reasoning. The left side of the brain is better developed with music, and songs can help imprint information on young minds.

2. A mastery of memorization: Even when performing with sheet music, student musicians are constantly using their memory to perform. The skill of memorization can serve students well in education and beyond.

3. Students learn to improve their work: Learning music promotes craftsmanship, and students learn to want to create good work instead of mediocre work. This desire can be applied to all subjects of study.

4. Increased coordination: Students who practice with musical instruments can improve their hand-eye coordination. Just like playing sports, children can develop motor skills when playing music.

5. A sense of achievement: Learning to play pieces of music on a new instrument can be a challenging, but achievable goal. Students who master even the smallest goal in music will be able to feel proud of their achievement.

6. Kids stay engaged in school: An enjoyable subject like music can keep kids interested and engaged in school. Student musicians are likely to stay in school to achieve in other subjects.

7. Success in society: Music is the fabric of our society, and music can shape abilities and character. Students in band or orchestra are less likely to abuse substances over their lifetime. Musical education can greatly contribute to children’s intellectual development as well.

8. Emotional development: Students of music can be more emotionally developed, with empathy towards other cultures They also tend to have higher self esteem and are better at coping with anxiety.

9. Students learn pattern recognition: Children can develop their math and pattern-recognition skills with the help of musical education. Playing music offers repetition in a fun format.

10. Better SAT scores: Students who have experience with music performance or appreciation score higher on the SAT. One report indicates 63 points higher on verbal and 44 points higher on math for students in music appreciation courses.

11. Fine-tuned auditory skills: Musicians can better detect meaningful, information-bearing elements in sounds, like the emotional meaning in a baby’s cry. Students who practice music can have better auditory attention, and pick out predictable patterns from surrounding noise.

12. Music builds imagination and intellectual curiosity: Introducing music in the early childhood years can help foster a positive attitude toward learning and curiosity. Artistic education develops the whole brain and develops a child’s imagination.

13. Music can be relaxing: Students can fight stress by learning to play music. Soothing music is especially helpful in helping kids relax.

14. Musical instruments can teach discipline: Kids who learn to play an instrument can learn a valuable lesson in discipline. They will have to set time aside to practice and rise to the challenge of learning with discipline to master playing their instrument.

15. Preparation for the creative economy: Investing in creative education can prepare students for the 21st century workforce. The new economy has created more artistic careers, and these jobs may grow faster than others in the future.

16. Development in creative thinking: Kids who study the arts can learn to think creatively. This kind of education can help them solve problems by thinking outside the box and realizing that there may be more than one right answer.

17. Music can develop spatial intelligence: Students who study music can improve the development of spatial intelligence, which allows them to perceive the world accurately and form mental pictures. Spatial intelligence is helpful for advanced mathematics and more.

18. Kids can learn teamwork: Many musical education programs require teamwork as part of a band or orchestra. In these groups, students will learn how to work together and build camaraderie.

19. Responsible risk-taking: Performing a musical piece can bring fear and anxiety. Doing so teaches kids how to take risks and deal with fear, which will help them become successful and reach their potential.

20. Better self-confidence: With encouragement from teachers and parents, students playing a musical instrument can build pride and confidence. Musical education is also likely to develop better communication for students.

I think you would agree that music is an inexpensive outlet for child and adults alike!

 

Also for older students music helps with preventing dementia and keeping your mind sharp – see here:

Music Helps Dementia Patients Recall Memories and Emotions

A recent study shows that dementia and Alzheimer’s patients can recall memories and emotions, and have enhanced mental performance after singing classic hits and show tunes from movies and musicals — a breakthrough in understanding how music affects those with dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Researchers determined the effect music has on dementia patients, by leading half of the participants through selected songs while the other half listened to the music being played. After the musical treatment, all participants took cognitive ability and life satisfaction tests. which showed how participants scored significantly better when being lead through songs, rather than only listening.

 

Here are five reasons why researchers believe that music boosts brain activity:

1. Music evokes emotions that bring memories.

Music can evoke emotion in even the most advanced of Alzheimer’s patients. Neurologist Oliver Sacks says that, “Music evokes emotion, and emotion can bring with it memory… it brings back the feeling of life when nothing else can.” By pairing music with every day activities, patients can develop a rhythm that helps them to the recall the memory of that activity, improving cognitive ability over time.

2. Musical aptitude and appreciation are two of the last remaining abilities in dementia patients.

Linda Maguire, lead author on the study wrote, “Musical aptitude and music appreciation are two of the last remaining abilities in patients with Alzheimer’s.” Because these two abilities remain long after other abilities have passed, music is an excellent way to reach beyond the disease and reach the person.

3. Music can bring emotional and physical closeness.

In the later stages of dementia, patients often lose the ability to share emotions with caregivers. Through music, as long as they are ambulatory, they can often dance. Dancing can lead to hugs, kisses and touching which brings security and memories.

4. Singing is engaging.

The singing sessions in the study engaged more than just the brain and the area related to singing. As singing activated the left side of the brain, listening to music sparked activity in the right and watching the class activated visual areas of the brain. With so much of the brain being stimulated, the patients were exercising more mind power than usual.

5. Music can shift mood, manage stress and stimulate positive interactions.

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America has an entire web page dedicated to music therapy in Alzheimer’s patients. They say that, “When used appropriately, music can shift mood, manage stress-induced agitation, stimulate positive interactions, facilitate cognitive function and coordinate motor movements.” This is because music requires little to no mental processing, so singing music does not require the cognitive function that is not present in most dementia patients.

Thank you for reading and Welcome Aboard Prontoguitar!~
RECOMMENDED GUITAR EQUIPMENT FOR EACH COURSE

I recommend that most students start with an Electric Guitar which you can buy with an amplifier – see the links below.

RECOMMENDED ELECTRIC GUITAR

Electric Guitar for students ages 4 to 8 year olds:

Electric Guitar for students ages 8 to 100 years old:

RECOMMENDED METAL ACOUSTIC GUITAR

METAL STRING ACOUSTIC GUITAR for students ages 4 to 8 year olds:

Electric Guitar for students ages 8 to 100 years old:

RECOMMENDED FINGERPICKING GUITAR

Fingerpicking Guitar also called Nylon String, Classical or Flamenco Guitar for students ages 4 to 8 year olds:

Fingerpicking Guitar also called Nylon String, Classical or Flamenco Guitar Guitar for students ages 8 to 100 years old:

LEARN HOW TO PLAY GUITAR TODAY & SAVE!

As you can see these guitars range in price to $55 to $120 dollars.

For beginners I would not recommend spending more.

My goal is to get you playing properly and the most economic way possible!

It is better to have a average guitar and get lessons then to spend thousands of dollars on a guitar and not really know what your doing.
Most guitarists make this critical mistake!
Eddie Van Halen’s first guitar cost $300.00 dollars yet he played incredible because he knew what he was doing!

Now lets look at the good effects of learning guitar for our children’s mental well-being and to increase their intelligence.

I have personally witnessed incredible improvements in concentration and ADD behaviors.

 

This article originally appeared on the Bachelors Degree website.

Nearly everyone enjoys music, whether by listening to it, singing, or playing an instrument. But despite this almost universal interest, many schools are having to do away with their music education programs. This is a mistake, with schools losing not only an enjoyable subject, but a subject that can enrich students’ lives and education. Read on to learn why music education is so important, and how it offers benefits even beyond itself.

1. Musical training helps develop language and reasoning: Students who have early musical training will develop the areas of the brain related to language and reasoning. The left side of the brain is better developed with music, and songs can help imprint information on young minds.

2. A mastery of memorization: Even when performing with sheet music, student musicians are constantly using their memory to perform. The skill of memorization can serve students well in education and beyond.

3. Students learn to improve their work: Learning music promotes craftsmanship, and students learn to want to create good work instead of mediocre work. This desire can be applied to all subjects of study.

4. Increased coordination: Students who practice with musical instruments can improve their hand-eye coordination. Just like playing sports, children can develop motor skills when playing music.

5. A sense of achievement: Learning to play pieces of music on a new instrument can be a challenging, but achievable goal. Students who master even the smallest goal in music will be able to feel proud of their achievement.

6. Kids stay engaged in school: An enjoyable subject like music can keep kids interested and engaged in school. Student musicians are likely to stay in school to achieve in other subjects.

7. Success in society: Music is the fabric of our society, and music can shape abilities and character. Students in band or orchestra are less likely to abuse substances over their lifetime. Musical education can greatly contribute to children’s intellectual development as well.

8. Emotional development: Students of music can be more emotionally developed, with empathy towards other cultures They also tend to have higher self esteem and are better at coping with anxiety.

9. Students learn pattern recognition: Children can develop their math and pattern-recognition skills with the help of musical education. Playing music offers repetition in a fun format.

10. Better SAT scores: Students who have experience with music performance or appreciation score higher on the SAT. One report indicates 63 points higher on verbal and 44 points higher on math for students in music appreciation courses.

11. Fine-tuned auditory skills: Musicians can better detect meaningful, information-bearing elements in sounds, like the emotional meaning in a baby’s cry. Students who practice music can have better auditory attention, and pick out predictable patterns from surrounding noise.

12. Music builds imagination and intellectual curiosity: Introducing music in the early childhood years can help foster a positive attitude toward learning and curiosity. Artistic education develops the whole brain and develops a child’s imagination.

13. Music can be relaxing: Students can fight stress by learning to play music. Soothing music is especially helpful in helping kids relax.

14. Musical instruments can teach discipline: Kids who learn to play an instrument can learn a valuable lesson in discipline. They will have to set time aside to practice and rise to the challenge of learning with discipline to master playing their instrument.

15. Preparation for the creative economy: Investing in creative education can prepare students for the 21st century workforce. The new economy has created more artistic careers, and these jobs may grow faster than others in the future.

16. Development in creative thinking: Kids who study the arts can learn to think creatively. This kind of education can help them solve problems by thinking outside the box and realizing that there may be more than one right answer.

17. Music can develop spatial intelligence: Students who study music can improve the development of spatial intelligence, which allows them to perceive the world accurately and form mental pictures. Spatial intelligence is helpful for advanced mathematics and more.

18. Kids can learn teamwork: Many musical education programs require teamwork as part of a band or orchestra. In these groups, students will learn how to work together and build camaraderie.

19. Responsible risk-taking: Performing a musical piece can bring fear and anxiety. Doing so teaches kids how to take risks and deal with fear, which will help them become successful and reach their potential.

20. Better self-confidence: With encouragement from teachers and parents, students playing a musical instrument can build pride and confidence. Musical education is also likely to develop better communication for students.

I think you would agree that music is an inexpensive outlet for child and adults alike!

 

Also for older students music helps with preventing dementia and keeping your mind sharp – see here:

Music Helps Dementia Patients Recall Memories and Emotions

A recent study shows that dementia and Alzheimer’s patients can recall memories and emotions, and have enhanced mental performance after singing classic hits and show tunes from movies and musicals — a breakthrough in understanding how music affects those with dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Researchers determined the effect music has on dementia patients, by leading half of the participants through selected songs while the other half listened to the music being played. After the musical treatment, all participants took cognitive ability and life satisfaction tests. which showed how participants scored significantly better when being lead through songs, rather than only listening.

 

Here are five reasons why researchers believe that music boosts brain activity:

1. Music evokes emotions that bring memories.

Music can evoke emotion in even the most advanced of Alzheimer’s patients. Neurologist Oliver Sacks says that, “Music evokes emotion, and emotion can bring with it memory… it brings back the feeling of life when nothing else can.” By pairing music with every day activities, patients can develop a rhythm that helps them to the recall the memory of that activity, improving cognitive ability over time.

2. Musical aptitude and appreciation are two of the last remaining abilities in dementia patients.

Linda Maguire, lead author on the study wrote, “Musical aptitude and music appreciation are two of the last remaining abilities in patients with Alzheimer’s.” Because these two abilities remain long after other abilities have passed, music is an excellent way to reach beyond the disease and reach the person.

3. Music can bring emotional and physical closeness.

In the later stages of dementia, patients often lose the ability to share emotions with caregivers. Through music, as long as they are ambulatory, they can often dance. Dancing can lead to hugs, kisses and touching which brings security and memories.

4. Singing is engaging.

The singing sessions in the study engaged more than just the brain and the area related to singing. As singing activated the left side of the brain, listening to music sparked activity in the right and watching the class activated visual areas of the brain. With so much of the brain being stimulated, the patients were exercising more mind power than usual.

5. Music can shift mood, manage stress and stimulate positive interactions.

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America has an entire web page dedicated to music therapy in Alzheimer’s patients. They say that, “When used appropriately, music can shift mood, manage stress-induced agitation, stimulate positive interactions, facilitate cognitive function and coordinate motor movements.” This is because music requires little to no mental processing, so singing music does not require the cognitive function that is not present in most dementia patients.

Thank you for reading and Welcome Aboard Prontoguitar!~
20 PRIVATE GUITAR LESSONS COULD EASILY COST OVER $1,000!

ENROLL TODAY & SAVE!

Receive the FIRST 3 LESSONS IN ANY OF THE 3 COURSES FOR JUST $9.99!

OR

OR TAKE ALL 20 LESSONS IN ANY OF THE 3 COURSES FOR JUST $59.99!

20 PRIVATE GUITAR LESSONS COULD EASILY COST OVER $1,000!

ENROLL TODAY & SAVE!

Receive the FIRST 3 LESSONS IN ANY OF THE 3 COURSES FOR JUST $9.99!

OR

OR TAKE ALL 20 LESSONS IN ANY OF THE 3 COURSES FOR JUST $59.99!